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Frequently Asked Questions


Researching and Applying to University

  • How do I apply to an Ontario university?

    Visit "Information About Applying", on eINFO, for details about applying to an Ontario university.

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  • Where can I find detailed course content and descriptions?

    eINFO provides general information about university programs and admissions only. If you would like specific university or program details, such as course content and descriptions, visit the universities' websites and consult their undergraduate calendars. You can find the universities' websites by going to the "Important Information" section of eINFO, and clicking on the "Contact Information" link.

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  • How can I find out more about universities outside of Ontario?

    The Ontario Universities' Application Centre (OUAC) processes undergraduate applications for Ontario universities only. If you are interested in applying to a university outside of the province of Ontario, consult the university's website directly or visit your guidance office.

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  • I might take a year off after secondary school (a gap year). Can I apply now, and if I get accepted, just ask the university to defer my acceptance until next year?

    Policies about deferrals vary from university to university. Some universities allow deferrals, others do not. Those universities that allow deferrals vary in how they treat them: some universities may request that you re-apply after your gap year (and pay all the associated application fees again), even though you have a deferral, so that they can ensure that your application and personal information is up-to-date.

    Therefore, if you're interested in deferring admission, you must contact the university directly for more detailed information.

    Depending on the university's policies, it may be easier for you to apply once, halfway through your gap year. At that point, if you are not a secondary school student, you will have to use the OUAC 105 application, available at www.ouac.on.ca/ouac-105/. Keep in mind that you must still adhere to the university's application deadlines.

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  • I’m interested in programs that are offered jointly by colleges and universities, which let students earn a university degree and a college diploma at the same time. Where can I find this information?

    There are a variety of university-college collaborative programs available in Ontario. For some, you must apply through the Ontario Universities’ Application Centre (OUAC); for others, you must apply through the Ontario College Application Service (OCAS).

    Any programs that are available through the OUAC are listed on eINFO. A good way to find these programs is to use the Program Finder on the eINFO homepage and do a keyword search for the word “college”.

    To view a list of all university-college collaborative programs available in Ontario, go to the "Important Information" section of eINFO, and select the link called "Collaborative University and College Programs (PDF)". Once you find some programs you are interested in, contact the university and/or college directly for additional details.

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  • Where do I find the length of a program on eINFO?

    eINFO provides only general information about university programs and admissions. It is a starting point for university research - not the primary source of information. Some universities may list the number of years required for completion of their programs; other universities may not. It is always best to check with the universities themselves for the most accurate and up-to-date information. You can find university contact information on eINFO, under "Important Information".

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  • I live in another province, or in another country. Where can I find information about Ontario university program requirements?

    Go to the "Important Information" section of the website, and select the link titled "Applicants Outside Ontario". This section provides links to university admission information for students in other provinces and countries. Contact the universities directly if you have any questions about their admission requirements.

    Please note: Students from outside Ontario must use a different application process than Ontario students. View the eINFO section called "Information About Applying" for additional details.

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  • My grades are not as high as they could be, because some special circumstances in my life have negatively affected my school work in the past year(s). Will the universities consider my circumstances when making offers of admission? Is there a way that I can communicate this information to them?

    Most universities will consider special circumstances when making their offers of admission, but each one deals with them differently. For more information about each university's policies on extenuating/special circumstances, contact your guidance counsellor for assistance or contact the universities directly.

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Programs, Grade Ranges and Admissions

  • If a program says that the "Grade Range" is 82%, and I have 80%, should I still apply?

    Definitely. The grade ranges (and enrollment numbers) provided on eINFO are based on the previous year's first-year admission. The range will vary each year, according to the number and quality of applicants; therefore, you should consider the Grade Range not as a "cut-off point", but as a general guideline.

    Also, remember that many universities use supplemental information such as essays, portfolios, interviews and personal information forms to make their admission decisions, not only your academic average.

    Consult the universities directly for the most detailed information about admission requirements.

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  • I want to study History, but the university in which I'm interested does not offer History as a degree. Does this mean the university doesn't offer History at at all?

    The university probably does offer History, but it is listed as a "subject of major interest" rather than as a degree name. "Subjects of major interest" are essentially majors that you can specialize in as part of a more general degree program. For example, the university might have a degree called "Arts", through which you could study a number of subjects including History, Drama, Economics, English, French, Sociology, Philosophy, etc. To view all subjects of major interest available through a given program, you must go to that program's "Details" page. In order to study one of the specific subjects of major interest, you must apply to the general degree program.

    For the most up-to-date information about program availability, contact the university directly.

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  • I have heard that some programs require me to submit extra information in order to be considered for admission. Where do I find out about these additional admission criteria?

    Yes, certain programs do require you to provide additional information in order to be considered for admission. This additional information can include such things as evaluation forms, reference forms or autobiographical letters. In some instances, students must attend an interview or audition, or submit a portfolio. You will find this information in the "Important Information" section under "Additional Admission Criteria". Alternatively, you can click on a specific degree in the Program Finder.)

    The best source of information is always the universities. Contact them directly for information about additional admission requirements.

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  • How do I know if changes have been made to the programs in which I am interested?

    The quickest way to find changes is to go to the "Addenda" page, located in the "Important Information" section of eINFO. On this page you will find a list of every program that has changed since it was first posted on eINFO in September. You can search for changes by university. The changes are organized by the date that they were made.

    If you are viewing a program in the "Compare" page or if you are viewing a program's details, you will know that changes have been made when there is a little "addenda" link at the top of the program entry. Select this link, and you will be able to view all changes made to the program since it was first posted in September.

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  • When the universities calculate my admission average or scholarship average, which courses do they use? Do they average all the courses that I have taken, or only the prerequisites, or only the top six courses?

    It will vary by university. Some universities use prerequisites in the calculation of averages, while others do not. You should research each university to see how they calculate averages.

    You can start your research in the "Offers of Admission" section of eINFO. This section outlines the number of courses that each university will use to calculate your average (and provides a lot of other very helpful admission information).

    Important note: The grade ranges provided on eINFO are guidelines that are based on the previous year's first-year admission. That range will vary each year, according to the number and quality of applicants. Therefore, you should consider the grade ranges on eINFO not as "cut-off points", but as general guidelines.

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  • How do universities treat grades from failed, repeated, or night school classes?

    Check out the "Offers of Admission" section of eINFO to find out how each university will treat these courses. Every university has a different policy.

    You should also contact the universities directly for more information. eINFO is only a starting point for research – not the primary source of information. The best source of up-to-date information is the universities themselves.

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  • I'm not an Ontario secondary school student. Where can I find information about program availability and admission requirements?

    The information on this website is primarily directed to Ontario secondary school students. However, if you are not an Ontario secondary school student, you may still use eINFO to find program admission requirements.

    If you live outside of Ontario, you can go to the "Important Information" section of the eINFO, select "Applicants Outside Ontario" and use the links provided to find details about each university's admission requirements.

    Alternatively, you can use the Program Finder to find some programs in which you are interested, then view each program's "details" page. On the Program Details page you will see a section titled "Applicants from Outside Ontario" that will provide links to the university's admission requirements.

    If you live in Ontario, but are not currently enrolled at an Ontario secondary school, you may be subject to different admission requirements than those stated on eINFO. You should contact the universities directly for further information about their programs and admission policies.

     For additional details about how to apply to an Ontario university, visit the eINFO section called "Information About Applying".

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Scholarships and Financial Information

  • How can I afford university? Where can I get funding for my studies?

    Financial aid for university studies is available from a number of sources. Visit the "Financial Support" section of this website for further information.

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  • What is the best way to search for a scholarship on eINFO?

    The "Searchable Scholarships" page consists of a series of drop-down boxes with various search criteria. You can fill in as many or as few of the drop-down boxes as necessary to narrow your search. The best approach is to do several searches, using different criteria each time. Don't forget to check out the scholarships with "variable" numbers or monetary amounts.

    TIP: Scholarships are categorized according to how much money is provided per year. Therefore, a scholarship that appears in the "Under $1,500" category may look small; however, if it is renewable for four years, it could have a total, four-year value of up to $6,000. In comparison, a scholarship that appears in the "$3,000-$4,999" category looks larger, but if it is non-renewable (available for only one year), it would have the same (or lower) total value as the first scholarship. Check out the Glossary for definitions of “renewable”, “non-renewable”, and other terms you may need to know.

    For the most up-to-date information about scholarships, contact the universities directly.

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  • I'm not an Ontario secondary school student. Where can I find information about scholarships and bursaries available to me?

    Many universities offer scholarships specifically to students applying from outside Ontario and from outside Canada. To find more information about this financial aid, contact the universities directly or visit their websites. 

    In the "Contact Information" section of eINFO, you will find links to each university's financial aid websites. These links provide a great starting point for your research.

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Using the Program Finder

  • When I use the Program Finder, I do not get any results. How can I get the results that I want?

    There are a number of possible reasons why you are not getting results.

    • If you have entered text into a search box, ensure that you have spelled everything correctly. Even a small error could invalidate the search. If you are uncertain about how to spell something, check the internet or university websites for proper spellings.
    • If you have used multiple search filters, consider removing one or two. Remember that each filter that you create is added to the others, so the more filters you create, the fewer results you will have. For example, if you have two filters, “co-op” and “engineering”, your results will show only co-op engineering programs. In order to view all co-op programs available as well as all engineering programs available, you would have to do two separate searches.

    A good way to search is to use only one filter at first, and see what results you get. If you need to narrow the results further, then add another filter at that point. The second filter will search through your existing results and provide a smaller number of results.

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  • What is the difference between the search box in the Program Finder and the "Search our Site" box at the top right of the site?

    The "Search our Site" box in the top right of the site will search through all information on the site, including programs, scholarships, campus visits, news, residence, language requirements, liaison numbers, universities and FAQs. In other words, it's a very broad search. The search results will be displayed in a list.

    In contrast, the search box in the Program Finder searches only program information (including the related degrees, study areas and university names), and results will be displayed within the Program Finder.

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  • When I do a search for "English" in the Program Finder, the results include a lot of programs that don't have the word "English" in the program name. Is the search working?

    Many universities give their programs very general names, such as "Arts" or "Humanities" or "Science". However, you can usually study a wide variety of specific "subjects of major interest", such as English, through these programs. For example, a university might have a degree called "Arts", through which you could study a number of subjects including English, Drama, Economics, History, French, Sociology, Philosophy, etc. To view all subjects of major interest available through a given program, you must go to that program's "Details" page. In order to study one of the specific subjects of major interest, you must apply to the general degree program.

    So if you search for "English" and the program name does not include the word "English", the search is correct - you probably can study English through this program. You just need to check the program's details to be sure.

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  • When I browse by program and select "Biology" (for example) it states that there are 33 programs, however, if I type "Biology" in the keyword search box at the top, it shows that there are 122 programs available. Why is there an inconsistency between the two search options?

    When you browse by program and select "Biology", there are 33 programs explicitly associated with that area of study. However, if you search “Biology” by keyword, you will find all programs associated with the term (programs with “Biology” in the title, subjects of major interest, as well as associated tags and study areas), which may return a greater number of results.

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Using eINFO - General Information

  • How do I save my searches?

    To save your searches, you need to be logged in to your eINFO account in the "Accounts" section at the top right of the page. If you do not already have an account, type your name (last name optional), a password, and an email address to create an account. Then click "Setup" and you're done!

    In the Program Finder, check the "Add to my Comparisons" box for any program you wish to compare. Once you are finished, you can view and save your comparisons by clicking the “Comparisons” tab and naming your search in the blank field under "Saved Comparison Name". Click the "Save Selections" button to save your list. You will then be directed to the "Accounts" page where your saved search will be listed for later reference.

    If you log in to eINFO later, use the same email address and password to view, edit or delete any previously saved searches.

    Remember to check the eINFO Addenda page each time you log in, to see if any program details have changed since you last logged in.

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  • I want to see all the programs offered at one university in one easy-to-read chart. How can I do this?

    Just go to the eINFO homepage: www.electronicinfo.ca. On the right side of the page, click the grey button titled "PDF Download". That button will take you to a page where you can access PDFs that contain charts of each university's information, including grade range, prerequisites and additional admission criteria.

    Using the PDF, find the pages that interest you, then print only those pages.

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  • I want to print some information from eINFO. Is there an easy way to do this?

    Just go to the eINFO homepage: www.electronicinfo.ca. On the right side of the page, click the grey button titled "PDF Download". That button will take you to a page where you can access PDFs that contain charts of each university's information, including grade range, prerequisites and additional admission criteria.

    Using the PDF, find the pages that interest you, then print only those pages.

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Other Information

  • I am interested in Medical School (or Law School, or Rehabilitation Sciences, or Dentistry, etc.), but I can't find any information about it in the Program Finder. Where can I find information about this program?

    Some programs, such as those listed above, cannot be entered directly from secondary school - you need some university studies in order to enrol. Details about these programs can be found in the Professional Programs section of eINFO, or in the "Programs Requiring Prior Studies" section.

    Contact the universities directly for further information about their professional programs.

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  • What is the OUAC and what does it do?

    "OUAC" is the acronym for the Ontario Universities' Application Centre. The OUAC is a centralized processing office for applications for undergraduate admission to Ontario universities. The OUAC receives and processes applications and then transfers the applications to the universities that applicants have selected.

    The OUAC does not make admissions decisions. That is the responsibility of the universities.

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  • How do I find information about applying to Ontario colleges?

    If you are interested in applying to an Ontario college, visit the Ontario College Application Service (OCAS) website at www.ontariocolleges.ca or visit your guidance office.

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  • I have not yet found an answer to my question about applying to university. Where should I go for help?

    If you are an Ontario secondary school student:
    Visit www.ouac.on.ca/ouac-101/ for a variety of helpful links. Select "Common Questions" for a detailed list of answers to common application questions.

    You should also get in touch with your secondary school guidance counsellors. They have a great deal of experience with the application process and will be able to help guide you to the resources that you need.

    If you have specific questions about programs and their admission requirements that are not answered here, you should contact the universities directly for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

    Finally, if you still have questions about the application procedure or eINFO itself, you can contact the OUAC.

    If you are not currently registered in an Ontario secondary school day program:
    Visit www.ouac.on.ca/ouac-105/ for a variety of helpful links. Select "Common Questions" for a detailed list of answers to common application questions.

    If you have specific questions about programs and their admission requirements that are not answered here, you should contact the universities directly for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

    Finally, if you still have questions about the application procedure or eINFO itself, you can contact the OUAC

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